Theon Greyjoy

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On December 4, 2019, Theon Greyjoy commented on Deezer’s Spleeter: Deconstructing music with AI :

That’s a remarkable depths of analysis, cool!

With all my love to open source projects, monetization is still uncertain. Professional usage is very limited and the idea of using almost anything to predict music the use like didn’t really work yet on my opinion. Did you use any service that was particularly good in that?

On December 4, 2019, Theon Greyjoy commented on Kensho – made in the Square, trades on the Street :

Thanks a lot for the post, big data and AI in investments are always extremely interesting, because of immense scalability potential. This case represents an interesting twist but the question that I ask myself is why the model is professional services? They don’t just collect facts but they interpret facts as signals to buy or sell using AI algorithms, so why not just to use it and bet some money if it really works?

On December 4, 2019, Theon Greyjoy commented on BrainCo’s FOCUS Headband: Brain Scan or Brain Scam? :

Thanks, it’s a really exciting and interesting topic! I’m not that convinced that the device is useful, however. What focus pattern is more productive? Intense and continuous or with regular breaks, or no focus with regular spikes. I guess it’s also person-specific.

From what I read about EEG, this method produces a lot of data that is hard to interpret. I’m curious what is the definition of focus from the biological standpoint in this product, as it’s hard even to understand what part of brain generated certain type of signal.

On November 12, 2019, Theon Greyjoy commented on Combining different data sources creatively :

That’s interesting that in this case, private gardens, which are rather a hobby are somewhat ahead of industrial agriculture.

It also reminds me of an interesting startup for city gardens: https://www.growsquares.com/#/

On November 12, 2019, Theon Greyjoy commented on Pushing the mantra “data is the new oil” to the limit :

I participated once in the development of a digital strategy for Oil&Gas company.

There were a few other exciting opportunities on the table.

One of them is a real-time drilling assistant that captures the data during the drilling and assists the operator. Due to the huge cost of the process, there were substantial savings.

Another idea was digital storage for soil and rock samples that bring the significant cost in processing, storage, and transmission of samples.

On November 12, 2019, Theon Greyjoy commented on The Met’s Goldmine of Data Assets :

That’s really cool! I’ll go through the exhibitions over the weekend, definitely!

I think this case returns us to the question of what is the goal of a museum. If it’s to exibit art to the public – that’s probably the most effective and efficient way.
The governance structure of MET is somewhat vague, but it doesn’t look like a money-making enterprise, so it’s a great fit.

On October 17, 2019, Super-massive Black Hole commented on AI-as-a-service with Scale :

That’s really interesting, thanks!

I have a question. My understanding is that this labeling is a necessary step to create ML algorithm, if the company already has ML algorithm that can do labeling – why human intervention is required?

On October 17, 2019, Super-massive Black Hole commented on KRY: Adressing rising healthcare cost with platform technology :

That’s extremely exciting space, thanks for the post!

I’m very curious about how the product features for direct visual observations are designed. This is possibly the main barrier for platform adoption because it’s one of the very basic tools of modern medicine. The governmental regulations exist for a reason in this case.

Overall I can’t wait when technology will break this barrier and hospital visits will become rather an exception.

On October 17, 2019, Super-massive Black Hole commented on Power Ledger: democratizing clean energy :

Electricity is a commodity and decisive factor for success or failure of any commodity production/distribution system is price.

I’m always very curious about three things: 1) the unit economics of green projects, 2) the impact of government regulations and 3) how the storage problem is solved. Quite often kWt price of green projects compared with traditional sources doesn’t include the storage component, quite significant for unstable solar and wind generation. Another problem is that cost adjusted by government subsidies what distorts the fair picture.

Most likely the business model will depend a lot on support of the government.

I agree with loremIpsum – the most interesting thing here is how they use this crowdsourced strategies for their own portfolio. I’d try some dynamic tracking of portfolio performance and re-balancing portfolio towards strong performers.

An interesting thing is that if it becomes really popular trends on this platform could influence the market (most likely indirectly through tracking by other players). I don’t know if the market will be more or less volatile as a result.

Thanks for the post – it’s awesome btw.

On September 24, 2019, Ivan commented on Invisalign – 9/10 dentists recommend additive manufacturing :

I’m curious what will be the reaction of professional orthodontists – I’d be stressed if I spend my youth studying the subject and investing a lot in this to realize that market for my services decreased twice fold. Or instead, it will drop the pricepoint and new customers inflow will balance the drop in bracket maintenance revenue?

What are the other similar options? Flat feet? Pillows? Seats?

On September 24, 2019, Ivan commented on Peloton’s Fast Clip :

That’s a great example of how digitization changes cost structure, removing capex from the equation and forcing competitive offering to focus on user experience.

That’s interesting that they are focusing on higher-end though. I assume that’s because it’s actually could be more expansive because the user is paying for the bike not only cash but also space in the house or apartment, which could be really valuable in densely populated cities. The convenience is a real differentiator that people are ready to pay for, not this transcendental tribal experience.

I’m curious how many similar cases of “places we don’t need anymore” are around. The most obvious are probably in adjuscent sectors such as treadmills (Peloton is already there) or rowing.

On September 24, 2019, Ivan commented on Peloton’s Fast Clip :

That’s great example

That’s interesting that they are focusing on higher-end though. I assume that’s because it’s actually could be more expansive because the user is paying for the bike not only cash but also space in the house or apartment, which could be really valuable in densely populated cities.

I’m curious how many similar cases of “places we don’t need anymore” are around. The most obvious are probably adjuscent sectors such as treadmills (Peloton is already there) or rowing.

On September 24, 2019, Ivan commented on Peloton’s Fast Clip :

That’s great example

That’s interesting that they are focusing on higher-end though. I assume that’s because it’s actually could be more expansive because the user is paying for the bike not only cash but also space in the house or apartment, which could be really valuable in densely populated cities.

I’m curious how many similar cases of “places we don’t need anymore” are around. The most obvious are probably adjuscent sectors such as treadmills (Peloton is already there) or rowing.